MOVEMENT BEGINS: Days After Alabama Passes Abortion Ban, Another State Now Poised to Do the Same

WATCH: Stacey Abrams claims protecting babies from abortion is bad for business


Liberals who freaked when Alabama passed a six-week abortion ban are going to absolutely lose it when they learn the state of Missouri is looking to pass a version of its very own abortion ban.

As USA Today reports, a Republican-majority in their House chamber will move on Friday to pass the major pro-life bill.

“If enacted, the ban would be among the most restrictive in the U.S. It would include exceptions for medical emergencies, but not for pregnancies caused by rape or incest. Doctors would face five to 15 years in prison for violating the eight-week cutoff. Women who receive abortions wouldn’t be prosecuted,” USA Today reports.

The bill is expected to pass and will then head to Republican Governor Mike Parson’s desk where he is also expected to sign it into law. The bill previously cleared the state Senate chamber on Thursday by a vote of 24-10.

“Until the day that we no longer have abortions in this country, I will never waver in the fight for life,” Parson said via USA Today on Wednesday concerning the legislation.

Fox News adds:

The bill includes exceptions for medical emergencies — but not for pregnancies caused by rape or incest. Doctors who perform abortions after eight weeks face five to 15 years in prison.

Parson, who supports the bill, has said he believes this gives Missouri the opportunity to be “one of the strongest pro-life states in the country.”

This new Missouri legislation follows an effort signed into law by Republican Alabama Governor Kay Ivey which similarly banned most abortions. As Fox News reports, the Alabama law made “performing an abortion at any stage of pregnancy a felony punishable by 10 to 99 years or life in prison.”

Here’s more from USA Today:

Supporters say the Alabama bill is meant to conflict with the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion nationally in hopes of sparking a court case that might prompt the current panel of more conservative justices to revisit abortion rights.

Kentucky, Mississippi, Ohio and Georgia also have approved bans on abortion once fetal cardiac activity can be detected, which can occur in about the sixth week of pregnancy. Some of those laws already have been challenged in court, and similar restrictions in North Dakota and Iowa previously were struck down by judges.

Missouri’s bill also includes an outright ban on abortions except in cases of medical emergencies. But unlike Alabama’s, it would kick in only if Roe v. Wade is overturned.

If courts don’t allow Missouri’s proposed eight-week ban to take effect, the bill includes a ladder of less-restrictive time limits that would prohibit abortions at 14, 18 or 20 weeks or pregnancy. Republican House Speaker Elijah Haahr has said the goal is for the legislation to withstand court challenges.