Trump Doesn’t Mince Words: Calls For Death Penalty For Mass Shooters, Senate GOP Responds

President Trump is calling for the death penalty for people responsible for carrying out hate crimes and mass murders.

Speaking at the White House on Monday, Trump said he instructed the Justice Department to pitch a new bill to Congress which would guarantee a person responsible for such an incident faces the death penalty. The new legislation would also expedite the legal process.

“Today, I am also directing the Department of Justice to propose legislation ensuring that those who commit hate crimes and mass murders face the DEATH PENALTY – and that this capital punishment be delivered quickly, decisively, and without years of needless delay,” Trump said.

“I am open and ready to discuss all ideas that will actually work and make a very big difference. Republicans and Democrats have proven that we can join together in a bipartisan fashion to address this plague,” the president added.

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The president also called for unification in his address, saying: “We must honor the sacred memory of those we have lost by acting as one people. Open wounds cannot heal if we are divided. We must seek real, bipartisan solutions that will truly make America safer and better for all.”

The president’s call for bipartisan action was quickly echoed by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell who said: “Today, the president called on Congress to work in a bipartisan, bicameral way to address the recent mass murders which have shaken our nation.”

“Senate Republicans are prepared to do our part,” the top Republican continued. “Today, I spoke with Chairman Graham of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Chairman Wicker of the Senate Commerce Committee, and Chairman Alexander of the Senate HELP Committee. I asked them to reflect on the subjects the president raised within their jurisdictions and encouraged them to engage in bipartisan discussions of potential solutions to help protect our communities without infringing on Americans’ constitutional rights.”

He added: “It was serious, bipartisan work that led to last year’s successful passage of the Fix NICS Act and the STOP School Violence Act. Only serious, bipartisan, bicameral efforts will enable us to continue this important work and produce further legislation that can pass the Senate, pass the House, and earn the president’s signature. Partisan theatrics and campaign-trail rhetoric will only take us farther away from the progress all Americans deserve.”

As the Associated Press reports, Trump said on Sunday that he was in communication with the Attorney General William Barr, FBI Director Christopher Wray, and various members of Congress.

In his remarks, he described the shooters as “really very seriously mentally ill.” He also said the shootings have been happening “for years and years” but “we have to get it stopped.”

“Hate has no place in our country and we’re going to take care of it … these are people that are very, very seriously mentally ill,” Trump contended.

During the interview, the president said his administration was “talking to a lot of people” and said, “a lot of things are in the works.”