Artist Handcuffs Statue Of Liberty To ‘Draw Analogies With America’s Past And How It Was Founded’

As the nation continues to debate how to address the ongoing border crisis, artist Izaac Zevalking said he wants more people informed about the issue.

To get more people thinking and talking about the issue, the UK-born artist painted the Statue of Liberty being arrested by United States Immigration And Customs Enforcement (ICE).

The mural, depicting the Statue of Liberty in handcuffs bent over an immigration enforcement vehicle, was composted on the side of a building in Las Vegas.

According to the Daily Wire, Zevalking told KTNV: “My purpose of doing what I did with the Statue of Liberty is to try and draw analogies with America’s past and how it was founded and how it was largely built by immigrants, to really make an analogy out of that so that people can apply that to contemporary society and contemporary issues a little bit more.”

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“I want people just to think about the issue really. Wherever that thought leads you. Whatever that conversation with someone else leads you. I think it really needs to be discussed more in human terms,” the artist continued.

The Statue of Liberty’s message and symbolism has been repeatedly pitched by those on the Left to advocate for a more tolerant immigration system, leading some to even advocate for open borders and the decriminalization of crossing the border.

Acting Director of United States Citizenship and Immigration Services Ken Cuccinelli was recently asked about the Statue of Liberty’s message when he announced that the Trump Administration would be implementing a 1996 immigration law that would prevent migrants in the United States from obtaining a green card if they collected more than one public benefit.

“It applies starting October 15,” Cuccinelli told the NPR’s Rachel Martin. “And the listed benefits will only be used in the analysis going forward after October 15. So people will not be surprised backwards in time.”

The Daily Wire reports Cuccinelli said migrants ought to “stand on their own two feet, be self-sufficient, pull themselves up by their bootstraps.”

Martin then asked, “Would you also agree that Emma Lazarus’ words etched on the Statue of Liberty — give me your tired, your poor — are also part of the American ethos?”

“They certainly are,” Cuccinelli answered via the Daily Wire. “Give me your tired and your poor who can stand on their own two feet and who will not become a public charge. That plaque was put on the Statue of Liberty at almost the same time as the first public charge law was passed – very interesting timing.”